Bike Size Chart: How to get right size of bike using 6 Methods

Bike Size Chart How to decide right size of bike

Imagine, you’re riding smoothly through the terrains or roads, and the sun is setting on your left. It’s an amazing experience, and I know you want to have it.

However, the bike itself can ruin your whole experience if it doesn’t come with the right size. Ignore all those quotes that said, “size doesn’t matter”. Well it does at least when you’re talking about bikes.

You’ll have a hard time paddling while you can say the smooth ride goodbye. Your backs and legs will hurt.

To make sure you don’t go through such hassle, I’m here to show you three methods ( actually SIX ) including bike size chart to find the right bike.

Here, with my guideline and the bicycle size chart, you’ll find every information covered so that finding the perfect bicyle size becomes easy for you.

So, without further ado, let’s dive in.

Here are the methods below that will help you to find the right size of bicycle. If you want to find out, why don’t you give it a read?

1 Select the right size bike by Age

The first one is very easy method that everyone can use to get correct bicycle by age. We’ve outlined bicycle inches by rider age range. So you can easily understand what size bicycle do you need by age.

Rider Age Range

Feet & Inches

2 to 5

12 Inch

4 to 8

16 Inch

6 to 9

18 Inch

8+

20 Inch

8 to 15

24 Inch

Adult

26 Inch

Adult

27.5" / 650B

Adult

29 Inch

Adult

29" / 700C

2. Bike sizing chart by height: What size bike do I need for my height?

 With the bike chart around, you’ll be able to find the right one that matches your height. It will show you the best possible match of bike size according to your height.

  • If your height is around 4 feet 10 to 5 feet 2, getting yourself a 13 to 14 inches bike is preferable for you.
  • If you’re about 5 feet 2 inches to 5 feet 6 inches tall, you should get yourself a bike that is about 15 to 16 inches tall.
  • The standard 5 feet 6 to 5 feet 10 inches tall people will find it comfortable to ride a bike with 17- 18 inches.

For more information, you can check the chart below.

Rider Height

Suggested Mountain Frame Size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Inches

Descriptive Size

4’ 10” – 5’ 2″

148cm – 158cm

13″ – 14″

XS

5’ 2″ – 5’ 6″

158cm – 168cm

15″ – 16″

S

5’ 6″ – 5′ 10″

168cm – 178cm

17″ – 18″

M

5’ 10” – 6’ 1″

178cm – 185cm

19″ – 20″

L

6’ 1″ – 6’ 4″

185cm – 193cm

21″ – 22″

XL

6’ 4″ – 6’ 6″

193cm – 198cm

23″ – 24″

XXL

3. Bike size calculating

If you think sizing chart by height are not your game, you can try calculating the correct size all by yourself. Yes, it needs a bit working; however, you’ll find this process pretty handy.

What’s stopping you? Let’s get going then.

  • Shoes add some ‘fake height’ to your actual height. So, you got to take off your shoes first. Now stand straight while making sure your legs are at least 15-20 cm apart from each other.
  • Use a measuring tape if it needs to measure the height from the ground to your crotch.
  • Set your priorities straight and think about which type of bicycle you want. Different bicycles have different measurements. There are Mountain, road and hybrid bicycle (I’ll talk about their sizes very soon, keep reading).

Now it’s time to calculate your right size by using a calculator.

  • Hybrid bicycle – Multiply your leg inseam (in centimeters) with 0.685
  • Mountain bicycle – Multiply your leg inseam (in centimeters) with 0.66
  • Road bicycle – Multiply your leg inseam (in centimeters) with 0.70.

Also you can use this calculator to find the right bicycle size – Ebicycles’ online calculator

4. Frame Size Chart: What frame size do I need? How do I choose a bike frame size according to my height?

Getting the perfect frame size is a must if you want to ride with comfort. Without the correct frame size, you won’t be able to control your bike correctly; as a result, you may end up crashing.

Here’s the chart you need to see. The frame size chart will show you what size bicycle you’ll need according to your height.

What size mountain bike is right for me

If you want to go with mountain bike, then you’ve to make sure you’re getting the perfect experience, you need to buy the one with the correct size. Let’s have a look at the mountain bike size chart below.

Sizing chart for Men’s Mountain bicycle

Rider height

Suggested mountain frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Inches

Centimeters

Size

Suggested Bike

4’ 10” – 5’ 2″

148cm – 158cm

13″ – 14″

33 – 37

XS

X-Small bikes

5’ 2″ – 5’ 6″

158cm – 168cm

15″ – 16″

38 – 42

S

Small bikes

5’ 6″ – 5′ 10″

168cm – 178cm

17″ – 18″

43 – 47

M

Medium bikes

5’ 10” – 6’ 1″

178cm – 185cm

19″ – 20″

48 – 52

L

Large bikes

6’ 1″ – 6’ 4″

185cm – 193cm

21″ – 22″

53 – 57

XL

X-Large bikes

6’ 4″ – 6’ 6″

193cm – 198cm

23″ – 24″

58 – 61

XXL

XX-Large bikes

Interested to buy mountain bike? feel free to check our mountain bike reviews & guides

Sizing chart for Women’s Mountain bicycle

Rider height

Suggested mountain frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Inches

Centimeters

Size

Suggested Bike

4’ 10” – 5’ 2″

148cm – 158cm

13″ – 14″

33 – 37

XS

X-Small bikes

5’ 2″ – 5’ 6″

158cm – 168cm

15″ – 16″

38 – 42

S

Small bikes

5’ 6″ – 5′ 10″

168cm – 178cm

17″ – 18″

43 – 47

M

Medium bikes

5’ 10” – 6’ 1″

178cm – 185cm

19″+

48+

L

Large bikes

What size road bike is right for me

You might want to switch to road bikes if you don’t like the mountain ones. They’re simple and gives the easy and smooth bike experience.

However, without the right size, your bike experience will get ruined. Check our road bike sizing chart below, and pick the correct one that fits you.

Sizing chart for Men’s Road bicycle

Rider height

Suggested road frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Inches

Centimeters

Size

Suggested Bike

4’ 10” – 5’ 0″

148cm – 152cm

24″ – 29″

47 – 48

XXS

XX-Small bikes

5’ 1″ – 5’ 3″

152cm – 160cm

25″ – 30″

49 – 50

XS

X-Small bikes

5’ 3″ – 5′ 6″

160cm – 168cm

26″ – 31″

51 – 53

S

Small bike

5’ 6” – 5’ 9″

168cm – 175cm

27″ – 32″

54 – 55

M

Medium bikes

5’ 9″ – 6’ 0″

175cm – 183cm

28″ – 33″

56 – 58

L

Large bikes

6’ 0″ – 6’ 3″

183cm – 191cm

29″ – 34″

58 – 60

XL

X-Large bikes

6’ 3″ – 6’ 6″

191cm –196cm

30"+

61+

XXL

XX-Large bikes

Sizing chart for Women’s Road bicycle

Rider height

Suggested road frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Centimeters

Descriptive Size

Suggested Bike

4’ 10” – 5’ 1″

147cm – 155cm

44 – 46

XXS

XX-Small bikes

5’ 1″ – 5’ 3″

155cm – 160cm

47 – 49

XS

X-Small bikes

5’ 3″ – 5′ 5″

160cm – 165cm

50 – 52

S

Small bikes

5’ 5” – 5’ 8″

165cm – 172cm

53 – 55

M

Medium bikes

5’ 8″ – 5’ 10″

172cm – 180cm

56 – 57

L

Large bikes

What size hybrid bike is right for me

If you want to ride like a tornado, a hybrid bike is a perfect catalyst for you. With advanced features around, a hybrid bike will give you the fastest ride experience.

The reason this bike called ‘hybrid’ is that the bike has features which are in similar to mountain and road bike.

I’ve prepared this hybrid bicycle sizing chart for you so that you can get the perfect hybrid bike for yourself.

Sizing chart for Men’s Hybrid bicycle

Rider height

Suggested hybrid frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Inches

Centimeters

Size

Suggested Bike

4’ 10” – 5’ 2″

148cm – 158cm

13″ – 14″

33 – 37

XS

X-Small bikes

5’ 2″ – 5’ 6″

158cm – 168cm

15″ – 16″

38 – 42

S

Small bikes

5’ 6″ – 5′ 10″

168cm – 178cm

17″ – 18″

43 – 47

M

Medium bikes

5’ 10” – 6’ 1″

178cm – 185cm

19″ – 20″

48 – 52

L

Large bikes

6’ 1″ – 6’ 4″

185cm – 193cm

21″ – 22″

53 – 57

XL

X-Large bikes

6’ 4″ – 6’ 6″

193cm – 198cm

23″ – 24″

58 – 61

XXL

XX-Large bikes

Interested to buy mountain bike? feel free to check our hybrid bike reviews & guides

Sizing chart for Women’s Hybrid bicycle

Rider height

Suggested hybrid frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Inches

Centimeters

Size

Suggested Bike

4’ 10” – 5’ 2″

148cm – 158cm

13″ – 14″

33 – 37

XS

X-Small bikes

5’ 2″ – 5’ 6″

158cm – 168cm

15″ – 16″

38 – 42

S

Small bikes

5’ 6″ – 5′ 10″

168cm – 178cm

17″ – 18″

43 – 47

M

Medium bikes

5’ 10” – 6’ 1″

178cm – 185cm

19″ – 20″

48 – 52

L

Large bikes

6’ 1″+

185cm+

20″+

53 – 55

XL

X-Large bikes

What size Bmx bike is right for me

Tired of riding on roads? It’s time for you to hit the skate park or race track and get the attention you need from everyone.

Try riding BMX bikes and start stylish stunts. To make sure you can buy the right size of BMX bike, have a look at the bmx bike chart below.

Sizing chart for BMX bicycle

Rider height

Suggested bmx frame size

Feet & Inches

Frame Size

Toptube

Stem Length

Bar Width

4'4" & under

Micro

15" - 16.5"

25mm - 35mm

20" - 22.5"

4'2" - 4'10

Mini

16" - 17.5"

30mm - 40mm

21" - 23.5"

4'6" - 5'1"

Junior

17" - 18.5"

40mm - 45mm

22" - 25"

5'0" - 5'4

Expert

18.5" - 19.5"

43mm - 48mm

25.5" - 27"

5'2" - 5'6

Expert XL

19.25" - 20"

43mm - 48mm

25.5" - 27"

5'3" - 5'8"

Pro

20" - 20.5"

50mm - 55mm

27" - 28

5'7" - 6'0"

Pro XL

20.75" - 21.25"

50mm - 55mm

28"

6' and over

Pro XXL

21.25" - 22"

52mm - 60mm

28"

What is the right bike size for my child

Why should adults have all the fun, right? Riding bike will help your kid to stay in shape. As a parent, you have to make sure your kid gets the perfect bike so that he always remembers his childhood cycling experience.

However, when you’re buying a kid’s bike for the first time, it can be tough for you to get the size right. So, there are few measures you should take to find the right bike sizing for your kid.

You can go to the kid bike sizing chart I gave below. Choose the size that matches the height of your kid.

For example, if the height of your child is about 85 to 90 cm, getting a 10 inches wheel size will get your job done.

If your kid is about 100 to 110 cm in height, you should get a 14 inches wheel size bike.

Here’s a chart you can check out to have an idea about bike sizes for kids.

Sizing chart for Kids Bike by Height & Inseam Length (Unisex)

Child height

Suggested kids frame size

Feet & Inches

Centimetres

Age

Inseam Length

Wheel size

Suggested Bike

2’9”-3’1″

85-90 cm

2 years

12"-14"

10"

10" bikes

3’1”-3’3″

90-100 cm

3-4 years

14"-17"

12"

12" bikes

3’3″-3’7″

100-110 cm

4-5 years

16"-20"

14"

14" bikes

3’7″-3’8″

110-115 cm

5-6 years

18"-22"

16"

16" bikes

3’8″-4’0″

115-120 cm

6-8 years

20"-24"

18"

18" bikes

4’0″-4’5″

120-135 cm

7-9 year

22"-25"

20"

20" bikes

4’5″-4’9″

135-145 cm

9-11 years

24"-28"

24"

24" bikes

5' +

145 cm+

11-14 years

28" and longer

26"

26" bikes

What size Electric bike is right for me

Electric bicycles can be your best pick if you want to go for something different. No, I’m not talking about a scooter. These bikes look pretty the same as the normal bikes.

However, they have few electrical components inside them, like the motors and batteries that help them to move faster.

Want to go for it? Well, you’ll be needing the right size of your electric bike. Check the chart out and pick the size you need.

Sizing chart Electric bicycle (Unisex)

Rider height

Suggested e-bike frame size

Height

Inside leg

Road E-bike

Mountain E-bike

Hybrid E-bike

4’10”-5’0″

66cm / 26″

47 - 48

13"

13" - 14"

5’0″-5’3″

69cm / 27″

49 - 50

13" - 14"

14" - 15"

5’3″-5’7″

71cm / 28″

51 - 53

15" - 16"

15" - 16"

5’7″-5’9″

76cm / 30″

54 - 55

17" - 18"

17" - 18

5’9″-5’11”

79cm / 31″

56 - 58

18" - 19"

19" - 20"

5’11”-6’2″

81cm / 32″

59 - 60

19" - 20"

20" - 21"

6’2″-6’5″

86cm / 34″

60 - 62

20" - 22"

21" - 22"

6′ 5″+

91cm / 36″

62 - 63

23" - 24"

23" - 24"

More Sizing Guides

Fifth – Sizing method: Bike Fitting Guide by Amazon

Sixth – Sizing calculator Bike Fit Calculator: eBicycles Bike Fit Calculator

Bonus – Sizing calculator – Jenson USA bike fit calculator

 

The Importance of Getting Right Size Of Bike

The Importance of Getting Right Size Bike

With all these chit chat going on, a question may pop up inside your head. ‘Why do I know what size bike I need?’ ‘Is size so important?’

Well, to be honest, as I’m writing this, I know this topic is a boring one to talk about and to learn about. However, this is pretty important, as well.

Not just comfort zone, if you don’t have the right bike size, you may face serious injuries as well. Now you’re getting a bit serious, eh?

Well, here’s why getting the right size bike is important. You may face a lot of issues in your body if the bike doesn’t have the right size. Let’s check a few problems below.

  • Back Pain Problems

Getting the right posture is pretty important. As you ride for hours, miles after miles, or you’re going through a mountain trail, you’ll eventually feel pain on your back.

This happens if you’ve got the wrong frame size for you that didn’t match your height. And trust me, this problem won’t go away very easily. You can’t expect to adjust seat post or handlebar as a solution.

  • Fatigue

For easy and effective pedaling, getting a bike with the perfect size is a must. If the bike adjusts to your height, you’ll be able to get the proper stance and leg positioning.

However, if your bike has the wrong size, your legs will have a hard time pedaling, and you can say goodbye to your biking experience.

  • Wrist Pain

Riders keep cycling even for hours. If the bicycle is too big or too small, you’ll see that the stance of your body is putting the whole pressure on your wrists.

As a result, your wrist will start to feel discomfort and pain, which may increase over time. While controlling the bicycle with its handlebars, you’ll need to reach further, if the frames are too large. This can give you a hard time cycling.

  • Crash Risk

Bike with the right size means, you’ll have better control over on it. If the bicycle is fit for you, otherwise you’ll face problems while controlling it. This may result in a major crash.

So, What’s the Solution? the solution is easy! take your right size of bicycle according any methods that we’ve discussed above

Want to know more on how to identify your height & leg inseam? Well, keep reading……

How to Measure Your Height and Inseam Length? 

To measure the right size of your bike, you need to measure your height and inseam length.

I’m not going to repeat all my banters on height measuring anymore. You already went past that topic above.

Let’s talk about how to measure your inseam length.

Don’t stress yourself, and you don’t need to be a nerd on Mathematics to measure your inseam length.

  • First things first, find a wall and stand with your back against it.
  • Make sure you’re standing flat as much as possible. If you are wearing any shoes, get rid of it.
  • Place your feet shoulder in such a way so that it remains apart.
  • Take a book and place it on the top of your inner legs.
  • Find a friend and tell him to measure from the top of the book up to the floor.
  • Did you get any measurement? That’s your inseam length. However, you should know that chances are, they’re not the same as you the measurement of your trouser leg.

Knowing these steps will allow you to measure your saddle height as well as your frame size.

You’ll get the Greg LeMond method pretty accurate if you do your calculations correctly. Now, all you need to do is multiply your inseam measurements (in centimeters) by 0.8333.

After you got your results, it is time for you to go up to your bike’s seat tube with your tape. Got the magic number? Cool, this is the place where you’ll place the top of your saddle.

Do you know what is the most critical metrics for bike sizing and fit? You guessed it right, it’s the number for your saddle height.

Using some sums and your inseams, you can calculate your frame size.

You got to take your inseam length in centimeters and then multiply it by 0.70. This is how you get to know the sums to find your road bike frame size.

In the case of a hybrid bike, you have to follow a different calculation, though. Multiply your inseam by 0.69 and Voila! You’ll get the results.

Take the same measurements when you’re dealing with a mountain bike and multiply it by 0.6. However, this time, you’ll need to change the centimeters into inches.

All the calculations above will give you the frame size of your bike as a result. However, the calculation process may vary according to the type of bike you’re dealing with.

Follow me if you want to measure the frame size of your bike. See the center bolt of your bike’s cranks? Good, now place a measuring tape in it. In the bottom bracket shell, this will be the center point if it is just the frame.

Now you see your seat tube? Run your measuring tape on it. You’ll get your frame size once you reach the end of the seat tube. Simple, isn’t it?

With all that being said, you may ask yourself, ‘Does the frame size matter?

The answer is a big YES. Want to know why? Well, keep scrolling.

Does it Matter Which Bike Frame Size Should I choose?

  • For Better Comfort

Without the correct frame size, you won’t be able to get the comfort zone as you ride your bike. Most riders want to get the saddle height right when it comes to bike sizing.

At the bottom of a pedal stroke, as you extend your legs to the full, you’ll want a slight bend at your knee. You’ll probably be in a war zone and find yourself struggling to get all the power out of your legs if the saddle is too low.

As you pedal, your hips will rock from one side to another if the saddle is too high. Either case, you may get discomfort which can lead to a major injury.

Rather than thinking much about the saddle, get the frame size right. If you get the right frame size, it also means you’re getting the right handlebar.

You’ll find a lot of road bikes that focus on top tube length when it comes to sizing. Rather than seat tube length, they go from seat post to stem.

The reason behind this is, you’ll find it very easy to raise or lower a saddle. While on the other hand, you may have a hard time moving the bars closer or further away.

So, make sure, you’re not too hunched up or stretched out when you’re picking your frame size. As a result, you’ll find the handlebar to be comfortable.

  • For Perfect Control

Getting the perfect comfort zone is a must. But, if you don’t have the ultimate control over your bike, how will you ride it? You may end up crashing.

So, get your frame size right. If you’re a criterium road racer, you’ll be comfortable with slightly smaller frames. This will give you direct control and power delivery.

If you’re into mountain bikes, you’ll have no choice but to drop your seat posts out of the way pretty often. To weave between the traffic, you’ll find smaller frames very comfortable as a city-based biker.

What to Do If You Got Your Bike Fit the Wrong Size When It Arrives?

So, let’s say even after a lot of research, somehow, you end up buying a bike with the wrong size. Or probably you already have a bike that doesn’t fit you, and you don’t have enough money to buy a new one.

What will you do?

I’m not going to tell you to throw it away. You can still make the best use of it; all you need to do is re-construct it a bit. Let’s have a look into the solution if you end up having a bike that is too small or too big.

Too Small Bike? No Problem

If your bike is too small, you need to make a few small changes. You’re not going to have much of a hassle, but you may need different parts such as stems or seat post.

  • Longer Seat Post

The very first thing you need to take care of is the saddle height of your bike. You can extend seat posts quite far as they have a fairly long length.

You’ll find a maximum extension mark on almost all seat posts. Make sure the post doesn’t pass this point. This is because to support the weight adequately; there’s not enough post in the frame.

If the post passes the maximum extension mark, you can end up bending or breaking the frame quite easily.

So, as a solution, you can raise the seat further by getting a longer seat post. You can find it anywhere in a local bike shop or online.

A 350 mm length post will come very handy.

  • Increased Saddle Set-Back

As your bike is too small for you, even if you don’t want it, the situation makes you stay too forward on the bike.

If you want to turn the tables, you need to slide your saddleback. To make things right, first, loosen the bolts on the rails of the saddle. Now, slide it back according to your needs.

Getting yourself a seat post with increased set-back is a wise thing to do if you find out that sliding the saddle back far enough is giving you a hard time.

The standard measurements of set-backs come in between 10mm to 20mm; however, you can also find 30+mm if you look around a bit.

You can also use pre-made shims to make it fit properly if you think the post has a very small diameter despite having the right set back.

  • Longer Stem

The position of handlebars and how close they are to your body is one of the most important factors you’ll have an issue with.

You can use a longer stem to avoid such a situation. This will help you by pushing the bars further in front of you.

Though it depends on how long the stem you’re having right now, to get everything done, a stem around 140mm to 150mm will be enough for you.

However, you should keep in mind, the handling of your bike will decrease as you increase the stem length.

  • Raising the Bars

Raising the bars will be the last thing you need to do. First off, make sure the stem is on the top of the steerer tube. There should be no spacer above it.

Secondly, get yourself a stem with a high angle. This will help you in raising your bars. The average stem angle between zero to seven degrees is enough. However, you’ll be able to get angles above fifteen degrees as well.

Dealing with Large Bike? Here’s the Solution

As I’ve talked about small bicycle issues, what if you got a bicycle that’s too large for you? Large bicycle can give you a hard time, especially when you’re not able to lower the saddle past the frame. Well, there’s no room for worries at all.

With a few techniques, you’ll know what to do.

  • Shorter Seat Post

Locate the bend on the top of the seat post. This is the dead-end, the seat post can’t go any lower past the bend.

As you find the bend, try to lower the post all the down to this point. You’ll see the seat post hits something, most of the time, it’s the bottoming out that you find on the water bottle cage bolts.

Now, it will be better for you to cut the seat post shorter. Make sure you cut it to the minimum amount you need. If you cut it too much and don’t leave enough amount for the frame, you may end up breaking the frame.

  • Sliding the Saddle Forward

If you slide the saddle forward, it will help you move forward, close enough so that you can fit the bike in a better way.

Loosening the saddle bolts will be a wise idea as you slide the seat forward as far as it goes in the rails.

Now get yourself a seat post that comes with a forward bend to it. Or, you can also get a post that can flip around, yet, still will help the saddle to stay in a correct angle.

  • Shorter Stem

If you want to bring the bars closer to you, a shorter stem will help you get your job done. You cannot get any shorter stem than 50mm.

However, make sure you don’t get the too short ones as this will can cause handling issues. I prefer getting above 50mm. If the stems are too short, you can get a twitchy feeling while handling the bike.

  • Lowering the Bars

You can lower the bars to a certain amount if your bike is too big for you. However, you have to make sure that the stem stays at the lowest point on the steerer tube.

There should be no spacers at all underneath. Now, you need to get yourself a high-angle stem. The stems with 15 degrees or above will do the work for you.

You can place the stem right side up or right side down according to your own priority. Whatever you do, make sure the size of the stem matches the diameters of your bars.

Still worried about bike fit? get bicycle fitting service if you order from Amazon

Try Before Buy (If Possible)

Just by studying lots of things on the internet won’t do you any good. You need some practical experience to know better.

If you haven’t bought a bike already, I suggest you to grab one and take it for a spin to have a test ride.

With this, you’ll be able to know which one the right bike for you is, so, here’s what you can do.

  • Go for a 15-Minutes Test Ride.

If you go to the local bicycle shops, they’ll let you take the bike for a short spin. You can ride for about 15 minutes for a test ride. This will be enough for you to understand if you’re comfortable with the bike or not.

But hey, it’s free, but you have to provide information to the shop as well. They’ll ask you for your photo ID, driving license or a passport. You may also have to give them a debit or credit card.

They’ll keep your card until you return with the bike.

Don’t have an ID? No problem at all because some shops have alternatives. They’ll charge you as you ride. You’ll have to pay the full price of the bike, and once you return, they’ll return your money too.

If you’re still confused about the bike size, you can ask the retailer, and he’ll pick the right size bike for you.

  • 24- or 48-Hours Demo

For a longer test drive, you can contact online retailers or offline ones. Again, you need to give them your ID, credit, or debit card or pay the full until you return and take the refund.

However, in this case, they will charge you some cash as you’re riding for longer now. For 48 hours, typically they’ll charge you about $60.

If you ride for longer, you’ll be able to know better which one is the perfect bike size for you.

  • Bike Hire

You’ll find cycle hire shops almost everywhere. Go to your internet search engine and type ‘bicycle hire’ and you’ll get your nearest bike hire point.

It’s more like getting yourself a demo bike, but there’s a difference though. The bikes you’ll ride are heavily used and are not for sale.

Since you have to use the heavily used bikes, you may find some issues with those. As a result, the bike you’re trying may make a bad impression (since it’s used heavily).

As for the price is concerned, for a one-day ride, you may have to pay $20 to $50.

Expert Advice Is Invaluable

You’ve made this far? Pheww! As you’ve gone through this article, remember, this is just the tip of an iceberg. You still can talk to experts and take their advice into accounts.

There are certain bike experts you’ll find available to chat online. On Facebook, you’ll find lots of bikers groups. Join these groups and talk to professional bikers.

You’ll be able to learn a lot of things, and these are always handy.

So, what’s making you wait? Decide, buy, and hit the road.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What age is a 24-inch bike for?

Ans. Kids who are around 8 to 11 years can use 24-inch bikes perfectly with no problem at all. It will fit their size as well. Normally, the people between these ages come with the inseam 24’ to 28’.

  • How much should I pay for a bicycle?

Ans. It depends on the model of the bike you’re going to choose. But let’s say you want the standard ones.

You’ll get a good road bike if your budget is around $350 to $700.

Want to get a good mountain bike? You can have a good one if you spend about 1000 bucks.

If a single-speed bike is what you need, it will cost you around $400.

If your budget is around $200-$300, you can get your hands on a good beach cruiser bike.

Getting a nice recumbent bike is easy if you can spend about $1000 to $2000.

Want a good bike for your kids? You can find it within $140 to $200, suitable for kids around 3 to 8 years.

  • What Should I look for in a bike?

Ans. While purchasing a bike, you should look if the size of the bike is suiting you, especially the frame size.

You also need to look for the suspension and the wheels. See if the tires, saddles, and handlebars are good enough to give you a comfy ride.

Don’t forget to test the brakes, shifters, and front chain-wheel sets.

  • How do I choose a second-hand bike?

Ans. First off, find someone trusted. If you think the seller won’t cheat you by selling that bike, you can take it.

Make sure you check the suspension, tires, brakes, and other things I mentioned in point number 4.

If it’s possible, take it for a spin for a day.

  • How tall should you be for a 26-inch bike?

Ans. You need to be in between 5 feet 5 to 5 feet 9 if you need to ride a 26-inch bike.

  • What bike should a 5’11 man ride?

Ans. If you’re a person who’s 5’11-inches tall, you need to get yourself a bike in between 26 to 31 inches.

  • What bike brand is best? What are the top 10 bicycle brands?

Ans. If you want my personal opinion, I prefer the Giant brand the most for bicycles. But you can try other brands as well and see what actually suits you. Here are the top 7 leading brands that have been running super-hot in the market.

  • Giant
  • GT Bikes
  • Santa Cruz
  • Trek
  • Specialized
  • Cannondale
  • Marin Cycles.

Wrapping Up

Congrats! You’ve made this far, and you’ve gone through all the information. Now, all you need to do is decide which bike you want to buy and match the bicycle sizing chart with your height.

That’s it, you’ll find the perfect bike, and you’ll love the soothing breeze as you take it for a spin.

So, what’s making you wait? Decide, buy, and hit the road.

 

Related Bike Buying Guides

Resources

https://www.ebicycles.com/bicycle-tools/frame-sizer

http://myworldfromabicycle.blogspot.com/2010/05/lemonds-sizing-chart.html

Last update: 8th January, 2020

About the Author Zachary Anderson

Hi, I am Zach who is behind Bikefeatures.com. I have vast experience about Bicycles as previously I have worked in a bike shop near to my home in Pittsburgh, PA. From there I have learnt lot of things about bicycles which is very important for a beginner bike to know before landing the first bike. I hope my articles about different bike reviews will help you to selecting the first bike. Happy Pedaling!

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